I received an e-mail last night from a gentleman named John Strickler, who is a professional development trainer responsible for setting up training class on various topics. He had some of the most positive things to say about my book to date. Some excerpts (posted with permission)

I had to teach a JavaScript class last week and despaired of finding suitable materials to teach from. That is, until I found your book!

I wish all technical books had as much real content and as little filler. Most technical books have 100 pages of actual content and 500 pages of reformatted documentation.

I don’t want your head to swell, but usually there aren’t any published books that I can teach from, but yours had several key ingredients:

1. Logical order of presentation. I could teach from your chapters in order
2.Example code, and plenty of it.
3. As we said, practical application of JavaScript, not some woo-woo stuff that the author figured out that is (maybe) cool, but no one would actually do it.
4. Good tie-in to the OO component. I bet 90% of JavaScript users never create objects, and so are missing a very powerful tool.
5. Excellent presentation of the DOM, and the cross-browser issues, without bogging down in excruciating details (but *sufficient* detail, nonetheless).

All I can say is that I am completely humbled, and pleased, by John’s comments. He was able to articulate exactly what I was trying to accomplish with this book. Not only does it stroke my ego a bit, but it also proves to me and my publisher that my view on what a JavaScript book should be was dead-on. I hope others have the same experience when reading it.

Disclaimer: Any viewpoints and opinions expressed in this article are those of Nicholas C. Zakas and do not, in any way, reflect those of my employer, my colleagues, Wrox Publishing, O'Reilly Publishing, or anyone else. I speak only for myself, not for them.

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